Vårens seminarieserie arrangeras av Mark Graham, Hege Høyer Leivestad, Johan Lindquist och Erik Olsson. Listan uppdateras kontinuerligt.

January

CEIFO seminar

January 30, 13.00–14.30, B600
David McCollum, Lecturer, Department of Geography & Sustainable Development, The University of St Andrews

Oiling the wheels? Flexible labour markets and the migration industry

The growing commercialisation of migration, often through a multiplicity of labour market intermediaries, is an issue of increasing academic interest. We seek to contribute to an emerging research agenda on the migration industries by exploring how one of the key actors that constitutes it, recruitment agencies, sits at the nexus between flexible labour market structures and migrant labour. Interviews with UK labour providers and low-wage employers form the evidence base for an analysis of the strategies developed by recruiters to derive commercial gain from connecting the so-called ‘supply’ and ‘demand’ sides of the flexible international labour market. We seek to contribute to understandings of the analytical categories within migration systems by illustrating how the migration industry interacts with other key stakeholders to structure international migration.

 

February

Research seminar

February 6, 13.00–14.30, B600
Camelia Dewan, PhD student, University of London

Climate Change Adaptation as Development Discourse and Practice

This paper contrasts the issues of sedimentation, dying rivers, eroding embankments and a clear demand for ‘maintenance’ with current ‘development discourses’ among various development professionals in Dhaka and Khulna to discuss the ideas, relations and practices that influence and shape the contradiction between ecological reality and development projects on ‘climate change adaptation’. I first introduce the frustrations of Bangladeshi civil society members in Khulna and how they feel that their concerns and priorities are not being addressed by those development professionals in Dhaka - the hub of politics and development aid in Bangladesh. I then discuss how this may relate to wider issues in the Anthropology of Development, from the shift from seeing such dynamics as a hegemonic discourse, to development as a ‘technical game’ (Rottenburg 2009) and as assemblages of heterogeneous development actors that through their networks create and sustain a variety of translations of ‘development’ (Mosse and Lewis 2006). I argue that those translations that lack brokerage embedded in local context and local needs, tend to fail the coastal populations of Bangladesh as they fail to provide the means to address these underlying issues tied to land-use and ecology, that are ignored when Bangladesh is merely seen as a ‘climate change victim’.

 

Research seminar

February 13, 13.00–14.30, B600
David Sausdal, PhD Fellow, Department of Criminology, Stockholm University

Pleasures of policing: An additional analysis of xenophobia

In police research, dominant explanations of why law enforcers harbour xenophobic attitudes are most often dressed in cultural or political rationalisations. As an additional explanation, this article demonstrates how resentments are spurred not only by prejudice or politics but also by the ways in which foreigners complicate quite ordinary yet, from a police perspective, appreciated work practices. Following this ethnographic discovery, the paper ultimately constitutes a call for a better grounding of our theories as well as critique in the wider context of the workday situations and sensibilities of law enforcement.

David Sausdal is a PhD Fellow in Criminology at Stockholm University. He is an anthropologist-cum-criminologist with a specific interest in ethnographic studies of cross-border crime and policing. Recently, he has been observing and examining the work of two Danish police task forces engaged in investigating property crimes committed by people coming from countries such as Romania, Poland, Morocco and Chile.  

 

Research seminar

February 20, 13.00–14.30, B600
James B. Hoesterey, Assistant Professor, Department of Religion, Emory University

Shaming the State: Piety, Pornography, and the Politics of Visual Culture in Indonesia

This paper examines the role of visual culture in the constitution – and contestation – of public piety during Indonesia’s controversial anti-pornography campaign. Building on Hirschkind’s concept of the “pious sensorium,” the paper describes how looking itself can be an ethical and political act. Inspired by al-Ghazzali’s notion of the “fornication of the eye,” celebrity televangelist Abdullah Gymnastiar preached that those who cannot control their sexual gaze eventually tarnish their hearts and lose their sense of shame. Turning his ethical gaze on the state, Gymnastiar leveraged his public pulpit to rally support to ban Playboy magazine by summoning state officials to take a moral stand. On the other hand, opponents of the anti-pornography bill deployed visual media to satirize what they viewed as inauthentic displays of piety by Islamist politicians and public icons. By attending to the diverse ways in which Indonesians mobilize media, this paper argues that an analysis of visual culture in post-authoritarian Indonesia provides unique insights into political Islam that enrich, nuance, and at times contradict the current scholarly focus on electoral politics and Islamist institutions.

Jim Hoesterey is Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies at Emory University. A cultural anthropologist, his research focuses on Islam, media, and the cultural politics of public piety in contemporary Indonesia. Hoesterey’s first book, Rebranding Islam: Piety, Prosperity, and a Self-help Guru (Stanford University Press, 2016), chronicles the rise and fall of celebrity televangelist Aa Gym. His current research examines public diplomacy, soft power, and the making of “moderate Islam.” He currently serves as Secretary for the American Institute for Indonesian Studies (AIFIS) and board member for the Commission for Visual Anthropology (CVA).

Organised together with Forum for Asian Studies, Stockholm University.

 

March

CEIFO seminar

March 6, 13.00–14.30, B600
Patrick Simon, Senior Researcher, Institut National d’Etudes Démographiques, Paris

Discrimination in a colour-blind society: racial divisions behind the French model of integration?

After being one of the most renowned “assimilationist countries” in the world, France has recently been engaged in quick changes in its framing of incorporation of “immigrants”. Indeed, not only have the concepts and theories used to portray the processes behind the “remaking of the French mainstream” dramatically changed, but the categories of those targeted by these processes have also been renewed. Access of “new second generations” (i.e. those born from the waves of immigration of the 1950s and 1960s) to the job market and their visibility in social, political and cultural life have challenged the “French model of integration”.

This presentation will first set up the background on which discrimination can be studied in the French context, and then it will confront the normative model of colour-blindness to the trajectories of potentially racialized immigrants and second generation. I will argue that the salience of race and ethnicity for minority members in contemporary France is challenging the expectations of equality beyond race and that discrimination has a devastating impact on the political model of colour-blindness. Data comes from a new survey Trajectories and Origins: a survey on population diversity in France, which is the largest survey ever done in France on immigrants and second generation. Promoted by INED and the French National Statistical Institute (INSEE), the survey gathered information via a long questionnaire administered in face-to-face interviews with 22 000 respondents from 5 specific sub-samples: Immigrants (8300), descendants of Immigrants (8200), Overseas French (700), descendants of Overseas French (700) and “mainstream population” (3900). Findings on employment, housing segregation, intermarriage and social networks, and discrimination will be presented to support the thesis of an ongoing process of racialization of the French society and the rise of ethnic and racial minorities.

Patrick Simon is Director of research at INED (Institut National d’Etudes Demographiques – National demographic institute) and is fellow researcher at the Center of European Studies (CEE) at Sciences Po. He was Visiting Scholar at CUNY in 2015-2016. Trained as socio-demographer at EHESS (Doctoral degree circa 1994), he has studied social and ethnic segregation in French cities, antidiscrimination policies and the integration of ethnic minorities in European countries. He has recently edited “Accounting for ethnic and racial diversity: the challenge of enumeration”, a special issue of Ethnic and Racial Studies, 35:8, 2012 (with V.Piché); Beauchemin Cris, Hamel Christelle et Simon Patrick. (Dir) 2015. Trajectoires et Origines: enquête sur la diversité des populations en France, Paris, INED, Coll. Grandes enquêtes; Foner Nancy and Simon Patrick. (Ed.) 2015 Fear, Anxiety, and National Identity: Immigration and Belonging in North America and Western Europe, New York, Russel Sage Foundation.

 

Research seminar

March 13, 13.00–14.30, B600
Elizabeth Hallam, Research Associate, School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, University of Oxford

Title and abstract TBA

 

Research seminar

March 20, 13.00–14.30, B600
Erik Harms, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Yale University

Title and abstract TBA

Organised together with Forum for Asian Studies, Stockholm University.

 

CEIFO seminar

March 27, 13.00–14.30, B600
Janine Dahinden, Professor of Transnational Studies, MAPS and NCCR on the move, University of Neuchâtel

A plea for the ‘de-migranticization' of research on migration and integration

An increasing number of voices has been calling for more reflexivity within migration studies, criticizing the nation-state- and ethnicity-centred epistemology that often informs this discipline. Consistently with this line of reasoning, I argue that migration and integration research originates in a historically institutionalized nation-state migration apparatus and is thus entangled with a particular normalization discourse. Therefore, this field of study contributes to reproducing the categories of this particular migration apparatus. This entanglement poses some serious dilemmas for this research tradition, dilemmas that ask for further consideration and possible solutions. I will suggest three ways out of this dilemma by putting forward a set of concrete possibilities which allow to  ‘de-migranticize’ migration and integration research.

 

April

Research seminar

April 3, 13.00–14.30, B600
Alex Nading, Lecturer, School of Social and Political Science, The University of Edinburgh

Title and abstract TBA

 

CEIFO seminar

April 10, 13.00–14.30, B600
Nauja Kleist, Senior Researcher, Danish Institute for International Studies

Title and abstract TBA

 

CEIFO seminar

April 24, 13.00–14.30, B600
Johan Svanberg, PhD, Department of History, Stockholm University

Title and abstract TBA

 

May

Research seminar

May 8, 13.00–14.30, B600
Elisabeth Lund Engebretsen, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Gender Research, University of Oslo

Title and abstract TBA

 

CEIFO seminar

May 15, 13.00–14.30, B600
Maryann Bylander, Assistant Professor, Sociology and Anthropology, Lewis & Clark

Title and abstract TBA

Organised together with Forum for Asian Studies, Stockholm University.

 

Research seminar

May 22, 13.00–14.30, B600
Ayona Datta, Reader in Urban Futures, Department of Geography, King’s College London

Title and abstract TBA

 

Research seminar

May 29, 13.00–14.30, B600
Chika Watanabe, Lecturer, School of Social Sciences, The University of Manchester

Title and abstract TBA

Organised together with Forum for Asian Studies, Stockholm University.