Abstract

This seminar paper draws on a paper based on repeat interviews with eighteen families resident in Kabul (2016-2018) carried out by Mona Hossaini and Razia Razaie. The paper by Hussaini, Schuster, Hossaini and Razaie explores the gendered nature of the decision-making process in Afghan families, as well as the gendered impact of drivers of migration.  Our analysis of the interviews revealed that process of decision-making is often a long, messy and complicated process in which men and women have different roles and employ different strategies in order to influence decisions. Furthermore, the considerations that influence their decisions also differ. For women, security is the sharpest fear even though they are less likely to move around in public spaces, while men who are more likely to be at risk, were more concerned with the challenges of providing for their families. Finally, we saw how the same drivers and processes and logic could lead to quite different conclusions.

Bio

Liza Schuster is based at City, University of London. Her research interests include forced migration and racism, European asylum policies and deportation. Since 2012, her work on forced migration and deportation has focused in particular on Afghanistan, where she has spent most of her time. Her recent publications include ‘Representations of exile in Afghan oral poetry and songs’, Crossings: Journal of Migration and Culture, 10:2, pp. 183-203, doi: 10..1386/cjmc_00002_1 (2019) (with Belgheis Alavi Jafari); ‘Fatal Flaws in the UK Asylum Decision-Making Process: An Analysis of Home Office Refusal Letters’ Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 1-17 (2019) ; ‘Deportation and Forced Return’ (with Nassim Majidi) in Forced Migration Bloch, A. and Dona, G. eds Routledge: London 2018; and ‘The Common European Asylum System: Inconsistent, incoherent and lacking credibility’ This Century’s Review: Journal for Rational Legal Debate No.1, 2018.